Friday, 23 June 2017

Austria will remodel, not destroy Hitler's birthplace, official says

VIENNA - The building where Adolf Hitler was born may be spared demolition, but emerge heavily disguised.

On Monday, Austria's interior minister, Wolfgang Sobotka, told the daily Die Presse that "the Hitler house will be torn down."

On Tuesday, he told reporters that the term "torn down" is debatable but the building, in the western town of Braunau, will be so thoroughly redesigned that it "will not be recognizable."



The "house," a large, three-story Renaissance-era structure, contains the apartment where Hitler was born.

Several members of a government-appointed commission on the future of the house said destroying it to end its attraction for admirers of the Nazi dictator would give an impression of trying erase part of Austria's history.

Earlier, Sobotka had said that "a thorough architectural remodeling is necessary to permanently prevent th e recognition and the symbolism of the building."

The government this year launched formal legal procedures to dispossess the home's owner after she had repeatedly refused to sell the building or to allow renovations that would reduce its symbolic impact as Hitler's birthplace - and its draw for admirers of the Fuhrer.



Vienna's Jewish community and a government-supported anti-Nazi research center support tearing down the imposing three-story yellow house, where Hitler was born on April 20, 1889.

A house in nearby Leonding, where Hitler lived as a teenager, is now used to store coffins for the town cemetery. There, the tombstone marking the grave of Hitler's parents, another pilgrimage site for neo-Nazis, was removed last year at the request of a descendant.

A school that Hitler attended in Fischlham, also near Braunau, displays a plaque condemning his crimes against https://www.houzz.com/ humanity.

The underground bunker in Berlin where Hitler committed suicide on April 30, 1945, was demolished and the site left vacant until the East German government built an apartment complex around it in the late 1980s.

The apartments overlook the German capital's monument to victims of the Holocaust.

2016 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/austria-remodel-not-destroy-hitler-birthplace-official/

Sky gardens: 10 of the world's best high-rise and rooftop green spaces

(CNN) -- High-rise gardens are on the rise, climbing faster than wisteria atop the latest apartment blocks and luxury hotels.

But most of these developments are private, leaving them accessible only to the well connected.

Hopes for a public paradise in the skies were raised by the "Walkie Talkie" Sky Garden in London, which made headlines when it opened the "highest roof garden in Europe" earlier this year.

Sadly, the viewing platform is more rockery than sky park, albeit one with a fantastic vantage point 560 feet (170 meters) above the city.

For true urban jungle experiences that'll oxygenate your soul, here are 10 other leafy green sky gardens:

1. ACROS (Fukuoka, Japan)

Rising like an overgrown Inca pyramid out of downtown Fukuoka, the 14-story ACROS building was designed by Argentine architect Emilio Ambasz.

Each level reveals natural wonders normally found in the forest, from glossy ponds to waterfalls.

The entire projec t contains more than 50,000 plants and trees.

On the way to the top visitors pass through a vast atrium, which extends into a semicircle of glass paneling. Inside are exhibition spaces, shops, offices and a symphony hall.

ACROS Fukuoka, 1-1-1 Tenjin, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka, Japan; +81 092 725 9111; opening times vary, typically 9 a.m.-6 p.m., weekends and holidays 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

2. Rockefeller Center Roof Gardens (New York)

The gardens offer views over Fifth Avenue and St. Patrick's Cathedral.

Though this one isn't regularly open to the public, we couldn't leave it off the list given it's the urban gardens archetype, inspiring properties like Kensington on London and Oakland's Kaiser to follow suit.

Instantly recognizable thanks to movies like "Spiderman" (2002) and "Fantastic Four" (2005), the Rockefeller Center Sprinkler Installation Flower Mound Roof Gardens opened in 1935 and include five terraces designed by pioneering landscape architect Ralph Hancock.

The entire project took two years to complete and included 3,000 tons of earth, 500 tons of bricks, 100 tons of stone, 2,000 trees and shrubs.

The Rockefeller Center Roof Gardens are occasionally added to the Open House New York weekend -- worth keeping an eye out for if you're in New York October 17 and 18.

The alternative is to book http://ambler.temple.edu/events/ambler-campus-shofuso-japanese-house-and-garden-tour an event -- wedding receptions are particularly popular.

3. Namba Parks (Osaka, Japan)

Visitors ascend gradually, picking a path through rock falls and thickets, over streams and under waterfalls, mindful of the cliffs that fall into the canyon below.

At the summit they take in the view -- and that's when it all comes flooding back.

There are no mo untain ranges, no rivers or plunging valleys -- this is Namba Parks, a shopping mall in the middle of Osaka, Japan's second largest city.

Designed by iconic American architect Jon Jerde and completed in 2003, this multi-story pasture camouflages glittering boutiques where fashionable citizens come to graze and ramble.

There's even a plot to grow vegetables.

Namba Parks, 2-10-70 Nambanaka, Naniwa-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan; +81 6 6644 7100; open daily, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

4. Kaiser Roof Garden (Oakland, California)

Industrialist Edgar Kaiser actually did put the "park" into car park -- or, more accurately, on top of it.

The Oakland, California, native was so enamored with Rockefeller's rooftop backyard in New York that he built an enormous 14,100-square-meter green roof above his own eponymous headquarters in the 1960s.

More Central Park than car park, its "water feature" is really a small lake with fountains and a wooden bridge.

L awns spread out from the water's edge to the tree-lined borders, making it large enough for a game of five-a-side.

Better still, anyone can visit -- just press "RG" in one of the parking garage elevators.

Kaiser Roof Garden, 300 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, California; +1 510 834 3575; open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

5. Kensington Roof Gardens (London)

The Spanish garden is one of three themed areas on the London rooftop.

This palatial green terrace in London's Kensington district is the Downton Abbey of roof gardens.

Created by Welsh landscape designer Ralph Hancock from 1936-1938, this 6,000-square-meter space is filled with fountains, fronds of palm and fern, flowers and even flamingos.

Hancock imported rock from Pennsylvania and planted 500 species of plants to fill the gardens' three themed spaces -- Spanish, Tudor and English.



Seven of the original trees survive to this day.

Kensington Roof Gardens, 99 Kensington High St., London; +44 0207 937 7994; tours are free but it's worth calling ahead to book as the gardens are often rented out for private events

6. High Line Park (New York)

Commuting up the West Side of Manhattan has never been easier -- it's literally a stroll in the park thanks to the High Line.

The aerial greenway runs along a section of the New York West Line railroad, repurposed in 2006, and carries walkers and joggers 1.5 miles (2.3 kilometers) from the Meatpacking District, across Chelsea, to the West Side Yard.

The park pays homage to the wild flora that colonized the line after it was abandoned in the 1980s. There are sun loungers, meadows, trickling brooks and cinematic views of the Hudson River.



High Line Park, New York; +1 212 500 6035; open daily 7 a.m.-7 p.m. in winter, 7 a.m.-11 p.m. in summer

7. Barbican Conservatory (London)

The Barbican in London is home to Europe's largest arts center, its concert hall, theaters and galleries renowned for showcasing the best in contemporary culture.

Less well known, even to regulars, is the enormous conservatory on the roof. Split over two levels, it's the second largest glasshouse in London, after Kew Gardens, and a sanctuary to more than 2,000 varieties of tropical plants and exotic residents like terrapins and koi carp.

Barbican Conservatory, Silk Street, London; +44 20 7638 4141; open every Sunday and on Sprinkler System Installation bank holidays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., entry is free

8. Waldspirale (Darmstadt, Germany)

There's nothing conventional about Waldspirale.

Roof gardens are, by their nature, different. Few, however, stand out like the Waldspirale in Darmstadt, Germany.

Completed in 2000, the apartment building and its roof terrace were the final flourish in the career of one of Austria's most famous artists, Friedensreich Hundertwasser, a man who believed straight lines were the "Devil's tools."

True to form, his Waldspirale ("forest circle") shuns conventional architecture. This U-shaped ramp of a building is topped with shrubs, grasses and "tree tenants" (as Hundertwasser called them) as it spirals 12 floors to a cafe where visitors can sip weissbier and admire the peculiar surroundings.

Waldspirale, 64289 Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany; +49 06151 2815755

9. Gardens by th e Bay (Singapore)

We've all heard of garden cities, but what about a "city in a garden"? That's precisely what Singapore has pledged to become. With the opening of Gardens by the Bay in 2012, it's not far off.

A kind of horticultural theme park, Gardens by the Bay's premier attraction is Cloud Forest, one of two enormous conservatories that dominate the edge of Singapore's Marina Reservoir.

Encased within is a 35-meter-tall tower of exotic vegetation, shrouded in mist, and the world's highest indoor waterfall.

Visitors take an elevator to the edge of the falls before descending via walkways through nine zones of tropical habitat. Surrounding the forest structure is a grove of Supertrees -- 50-meter-high, alien-looking towers that also have high walks suspended between them for treetop views of the gardens.

Gardens by the Bay, 18 Marina Gardens Drive, Singapore; +65 6420 6848; open daily 5 a.m.-2 a.m., free entry; to book tickets for Cloud Fore st visit gardensbythebay.com; open daily, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

10. Torre Guinigi (Lucca, Italy)

Despite being the home of opera composer Puccini, Lucca is the unsung star of Tuscan cities, overshadowed by the Renaissance majesty of Florence and the Palio perfection of medieval Siena.

But when it comes to gardens, the others can't compete.

Lucca's centerpiece is the Torre Guinigi, instantly recognizable for its crown of holm oaks, planted as a statement of nobility by the Guinigi family in the late 1300s.

Today the surviving canopy provides shade from the Mediterranean sun, particularly welcome after the prodigious climb to get there.

Torre Guinigi, Via S. Andrea, Lucca, Italy; +39 0583 583086; open 9:30 a.m.-4:30 a.m. year round; tower tickets cost 4 euros

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/15/travel/amazing-gardens/

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Home & Garden - InfoBarrel

Stop Zika: San Francisco Plant (Codiaeum variegatum) Kills Mosquito Eggs and LarvaeWouldn't you know it, a teen has found a way to kill mosquito eggs and larvae within 24 hours by using a common plant. What's more, the San Francisco plant (aka Codiaeum variegatum aka Garden Croton or Variegated Croton) is super easy to grow Sprinkler Sprinkler Installation Fort Worth Installation Fort Worth indoors and outdoors. It requires hardly any care. I even included a handy make-your-own plant extract recipe to kill mosquito eggs and larvae in and around your own home. Fortunately, on Zazzle, this plant is available for purchase from a reputable, customer-support based company (so I included it within this article).





http://www.infobarrel.com/c-Home_and_Garden

Monday, 19 June 2017

Battle of the Nasal Washes

How many times http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/outdoors/landscaping/the-essential-steps-to-landscape-design-pictures are children admonished not to put things up their noses? Yet somehow fingers, food and small toys eventually get up there and a disgruntled parent, teacher, doctor or other unfortunate party is stuck with the slimy job of removing said object from those twin mucousal highways.

So, it is understandable that the idea of snorting, squirting or pouring a salt water solution up the nose on purpose might be regarded with suspicion.

"You squeeze [water] in one nostril and out the other. It's freaky," said Dr. Donald Levy, medical director at the Osher Clinical Center for Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "But you're letting the body find a way to heal itself with minimal intervention."

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Nasal irrigation, sometimes called a nasal rinse or, if you want to be posh, nasal lavage, can ease sinus-related problems, from the common cold to allergies. While there are several methods of getting the water up there in the first place, the general process involves water going up the nose and out again in order https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ox7DicTda0I to flush out mucous, allergens and germs to ease sinus-related problems, from the common cold to allergies.



The simplest way t o irrigate might be to sniff the water up from a cupped hand, while a nebulizer, which creates a fine mist that one breathes in to clear out the nasal passages, would be more complicated.

Ultimately, the method of nasal irrigation used depends on what people find works best to manage their symptoms, though there have been studies that show some methods are more effective than others.

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A 2002 study published in the journal The Laryngoscope used a dyed solution laced with traceable markers to compare three methods of nasal irrigation to determine how much solution traveled through the nasal passages and where the solution went. Irrigation techniques that allowed more water to reach further into the nasal passages were deemed most effective.

The only technique that did not pass muster was the nebulizer, according to the study, because the vapor remains in the fleshy part of the nose and is ineffective at irrigating the nasal passages.

Visit the On Call+ Cold & Flu Center

The following are videos of three different nasal irrigation methods. With expert comments, see which method comes out on top and which one goes down the drain.

Technique #1: Syringe

Robyn Curhan, 43, found relief from the pain and pressure in her sinuses by using a syringe to do saline nasal irrigation.

Watch a video demonstrating nasal irrigation using a syringe.

Using syringes to do nasal irrigation is an example of positive pressure irrigation, in which pressure is applied to a liquid so that it travels up the nostrils. The Laryngoscope study found positive pressure to be most effective at distributing a lot of solution far into the nasal passages.

Flushing a large area of the nasal passages clears mucous buildup and irritating allergens, allowing fluids in the sinuses -- the large and small cavernous areas concentrated around the nose, behind the eyes and up into the forehead -- to drain freely through the nose.< br>


Clearing these regions helps prevent the pain and pressure that occur due to backed up sinus fluids during a cold or severe allergies.

But doctors urge caution when using syringes because they can spray water with force. And if water does not drain out through the nostrils, it drains through the throat.

"I worry that people would be too vigorous," said Dr. Roberta Lee, medical director at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. "People don't realize how delicate the tissues up there are."

To protect those tissues a little and remove some of the sting of the salt water, Haddon recommends adding a pinch of baking powder, as Curhan does, to lower the pH and buffer the solution.

Technique #2: Squeeze Bottle

Kellie Gentry, 28, relies on a nasal rinse with a squeeze bottle to keep her sinuses c lear, and it is a proven method.

"It gets to the sinuses as well as you're going to get," said Levy of the Osher Clinical Center. "To me the gut feeling is I'm now draining better. I feel less irritated."

Watch a video demonstrating nasal irrigation using a squeeze bottle.

Rinsing with squeeze bottles is a fast, cheap and easy way to clear nasal passages and reduce the effects of a cold or an allergy as well as the need for medications. Packs like Gentry's, complete with prepared salt mixes, are available at almost any drugstore or supermarket.

And squeeze bottles are another form of positive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ox7DicTda0I pressure irrigation. The Laryngoscope study found that positive pressure irrigation is particularly effective at clearing the drainage areas for the ethmoid sinus regions by the bridge of the nose and the maxillary sinus regions on either side of the nose.

Neg ative pressure irrigation -- water sniffed up from a cupped hand -- was comparable to positive irrigation, according to the study, although it did not distribute the solution as evenly.

But saline nasal rinses can be uncomfortable unless you get the technique down.

Dr. Sezelle Gereau Haddon, assistant professor and clinical instructor of pediatric otolaryngology at Children's Hospital of New York, recommends a technique for using squeeze bottles that involves bending forward and panting "like a puppy" to keep the palate elevated and close off the back of the nose so the rinse water does not flow down the throat.

"All this gunk kind of comes out your nose," which clears out the area where many of the major sinus cavities drain, said Haddon.

And for those who are still wary of shooting water into the nose, Levy has some reassuring words:

"Water is not going to go into the brain, even if you try."

Technique #3: Neti Pot

Carrie Erwin, 26, tapped into a less modern but still effective technique to clear her nose.

Watch a video demonstrating nasal irrigation using a neti pot.

Though neti pots were not included in the 2002 study, they have long been used to manage sinus problems. Neti pots originated in Southeast Asia as an Ayurvedic cleansing technique. Traditional pots look like ceramic Aladdin lamps, squat with long, slender spouts that get pushed into the nostrils.

Tilting the head allows the water to flow into one nostril, travel up behind the nose into the nasopharynx and flow out the other nostril. Water that does not drain through the nose can be spit out through the mouth.

Irrigating with neti pots falls somewhere between positive and negative irrigation, Lee said, as a more passive way to cleanse the nasal passages.

But some may not find the "pouring" sensation combined with tilting the head comforting.

"Patients often feel like they're drowning," Haddon said.

The drowning sensation could be a matter of technique, but Haddon said that it was impossible to get her patients to comply with using it.

Still, there are reasons to try irrigating with neti pots if other methods do not work well.

"They're gentle, they're not under pressure," Lee said. "Simpler is better."

-------

Spring allergy season is here! Visit the ABCNews.com OnCall+ Allergy Center to get all your questions answered about pollen, allergic rhinits, sinusitis and more.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/AllergiesNews/battle-nasal-washes/story?id=5977773

Sunday, 18 June 2017

Landscaping

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Landscaping refers to any activity that modifies the visible features of an area of land, including:

living elements, such as flora Sprinkler Installation or fauna; or what is commonly called gardening, the art and craft of growing plants with a Sprinkler System goal of creating a beautiful environment within the landscape.

natural elements such as landforms, terrain shape and elevation, or bodies of water; and

abstract elements such as the weather and lighting conditions.

Landscaping requires expertise in horticulture and artistic design.

Contents

1 Understanding the land

2 Tools

3 See also

4 References

Understanding the land

Construction requires study and observation. It is not the same in different parts of the world. Landscaping varies according to different regions.[1] Therefore, normal ly local natural experts are recommended if it is done for the first time. Understanding of the site is one of the chief essentials for successful landscaping. Different natural features like terrain, topography, soil qualities, prevailing winds, depth of the frost line, and the system of native flora and fauna must be taken into account.[2] Sometimes the land is not fit for landscaping. In order to landscape it, the land must be reshaped. This reshaping of land is called grading.[2]

Removal of earth from the land is called cutting while when earth is added to the slope, it is called filling. Sometimes the grading process may involve removal of excessive waste (landfills), soil and rocks, so designers should take into account while in the planning stage.[3][4]



Tools

In the start, the landscaping contractor makes a letter which is a rough design and layout of what could be done with the land in order to achieve the desired outcome.[2] Different pencils are required to make graphics of the picture. Landscaping[5] has become more technological than natural, as few projects begin without bulldozers, lawnmowers, or chainsaws.[1] Different areas have different qualities of plants. Fertilizers are required for this purpose in excess amounts as natural landscaping is done. Some landscapers prefer to use mix gravel with rocks of varying sizes to add interest in large areas.[6]

See also

Aquascaping

Arboriculture

Ecoscaping

Horticulture

Landscape architecture

Landscape contracting< br>
Landscape design

Landscape ecology

Landscape engineering

Landscape planning

Naturescaping

Sustainable landscaping

Terraforming

Xeriscaping

References

^ a b Natural Landscaping: Designing With Native Plant Communities - John Diekelmann, Robert M. Schuster - Google Books. Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-04-10.

^ a b c Landscaping Principles and Practices - Jack Ingels - Google Books. Books.google.co.uk. 2009-01-15. Retrieved 2013-04-10.

^ Landscaping - William Slack - Google Books. Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-04-10.

^ Taylor's Master Guide to Landscaping - Rita Buchanan - Google Books. Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-04-10.

^ John Smith. "Landscaping by landscape gardeners: Methods and Tactics". New Ways Landscaping Design. Retrieved 2016-06-14.

^ Sharon Cohoon and Jim McCausland. "How to Landscape Gravel - Page 2". Sunset.com. Archived from the original on March 19, 2 012. Retrieved 2013-04-10.

v

t

e

Land use

General

Degradation

Development/Conversion

Planning

Conflict

Land management

Sustainable land management

Landscaping

Integrated landscape management

Land grabbing

Land consumption

Land loss

Habitat loss

Illegal construction

Land reclamation

Land rehabilitation

Landscape ecology

Rangeland management

Environmental planning

Leopold matrix

Watertable http://store.rainbird.com/ control

Developed environments

Built-up area

Property

Property

Subdivision (land)

Real estate developer

Land development bank

Land (economics)

Customary land

Related fields

Soil

Soil science

Soil compaction

Soil pollution

Overpopulation

Pollution
< br>Deforestation

Urban planning

Infrastructure

Urban renewal

Agriculture

Permaculture

Drainage system (agriculture)

Sustainable agriculture



Category Categories: Land use



Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php ?title=Landscaping&oldid=776521820"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landscaping

13 Funniest Dog vs. Sprinkler Videos

From unfamiliar visitors to pesky local wildlife, man's best friend would do anything Sprinkler System Installation to protect us from potential harm. Even if that potential harm comes in the form of a sprinkler.

Deep down we appreciate Sprinkler System Installation their steadfast and earnest guardianship, of course, but we can't help but laugh when these heroic pups are thwarted time and again by their elusive grass-watering enemies. So in celebration of our four-legged warriors, we searched for some of the funniest dog vs. sprinkler battles on the Web. Vote for your favorites below!



Sped Up, But Still Hilarious



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/28/funniest-dogs-vs-sprinkler-videos_n_912530.html

Saturday, 17 June 2017

Household Products For The Garden

Your kitchen may hold remedies to some common garden and house plant problems.

Garden designer P. Allen Smith shared with us some solutions you can whip up in your kitchen. He says they're cheaper than commercial pesticides and much easier on the environment.

He also gave us his secret for promoting blooms on rose bushes, using another item you may have in your kitchen.

Smith says chemicals purchased at a garden center will kill anything in their path, and nothing you can make yourself will be as effective. However, by mixing up some common organic and cheap household products, Smith says you can take care of many types of bugs and fungus without hurting plants, pets, the environment or yourself.

Spray Those Plants

When getting rid of pests, Smith tries to use an approach that will have a low impact on the environment. This means he avoids chemicals whenever possible. The first defense he always tries is simply hitting the plant with a hard burst of water in hopes of knocking off bugs. If that doesn't work, he then sprays with the solutions listed above. Chemicals are always a last resort.

Before spraying, make sure the plant is well hydrated. If you are spraying houseplants, you may want to set the plant on a plastic bag. Early morning is the best time to spray, Smith says.

Home gardeners tend to make one big mistake when spraying plants: They often spray only across the top of the plant. Smith says it's essential to get under the leaves where most insects thrive.

Here are a few common pests and some remedies for them that Smith demonstrated on The Saturday Early Show:

Aphids: There are thousands of types of aphids - tiny pear-shaped insects that suck plant sap and weaken the plant. These pests are drawn to new growth and are typically found along stems or on the underside of leaves. Smith says they are quite "social" and are always found in clusters.

Plants infested wi th aphids will have curled and deformed leaves. You may also notice a sticky sap on the surface of the leaves.

Smith gave us this recipe for a solution that you can spray on a plant to help combat aphids:

Make a solution of:

1 tablespoon of dishwashing liquid

1 cup of vegetable oil

Dilute:

1 tablespoon of the solution in 1 cup of water

Mealy Bugs: These bugs are white, soft-bodied insects that suck plant juices. They are normally Sprinkler System Installation found where leaves join stems or along leaf http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/outdoors/landscaping veins. Mealy bugs cause a plant's leaves to turn yellow and drop.

Because the insects have a waxy coating designed to protect them from predators, they can be resistant to liquids and thus hard to get rid of, says Smith.

Smith's homem ade solution to combat these pests :

Mix together:

1 part rubbing alcohol

3 parts water

Smith suggests you test this solution on a small area of the plant and wait 24 hours before spraying the entire plant because some plants are sensitive to alcohol.

Black Spot: This is a fungus that attacks roses, particularly in humid weather or climate. Once leaves are damaged they can't repair themselves. But, Smith says, it is possible to prevent the problem from spreading by spraying the plant with the following solution:



Mix together:

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 tablespoon dormant oil

1/2 teaspoon insecticidal soap or dish soap

1 gallon of water

While baking soda is the essential element of this recipe, the oil helps it stick to the leaves and the soap helps distribute the oil particles, according to Smith.
< br>Bananas and Roses

Smith says he always buries banana peels in the ground before planting his roses. The peels are loaded with potassium, phosphorus and magnesium, elements that contribute to vigorous growth. He suggests chopping up two or three peels and placing them in the hole before adding more compost and the plant. You can continue to add peels to the soil around the flower all summer long.

Coffee Grounds

According to Smith, those old, used coffee grounds actually are good for something. They can provide your soil with nitrogen. Sprinkled in your garden, the grounds act as a mild, slow-release fertilizer - similar to fallen leaves decomposing.

Smith suggests spreading the coffee grounds thinly because big clumps of wet grounds can get moldy. They are even more effective when composted first. Compost adds a great humus texture to the soil. Remember that not all plants like the acid in coffee grounds, but vegetables, azaleas and conifers are all good bets.



Egg Shells

Crushed egg shells add calcium to the soil, says Smith. You Sprinkler Installation Denton often hear of people putting lime (calcium carbonate) into their gardens, but egg shells also will work. Calcium is essential for cell growth in all plants, but growing plants quickly deplete the surrounding soil of calcium. Smith recommends washing the shells or composting them before placing them in the garden. Otherwise, you might attract unwanted animals to your yar d.

2003 CBS. All rights reserved.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/household-products-for-the-garden/